Tag Archives: nature

Sea Anemone Project

My family are all scuba divers. I love being under the water it’s such a magical place! Feel like a mermaid. It’s brilliant. When I’m under I usually tend to touch things. It’s tempting when there’s colourful little feathery crawlies and wobbly jellies. Once, I got so into it I actually rubbed my face against a sea anemone and it ended up stinging me all over! Ouch. Yes – tip for today: maybe don’t touch things when you haven’t got a clue what it is. Following on from that, I based this project on sea anemones.

They are amazing underwater jellies that possess long wobbly tentacles which wave with the tide. Their colours are vibrant and can usually in groups competing for light just like land plants would do. I really wanted to capture this sense of cluster growth and bright colour, in addition to their strange jelly quality. Here are some of my sketches illustrating their bulbous forms, colour and alien-like features. Be prepared, some of them can be a bit… well, a bit suggestive in shape.

The last picture was my first sample in which I created 3-dimensional crevasses and little hints of colour. I was very pleased with the result as allowed me to think of all kinds of shapes –  the possibilities seemed endless! I even got excited about colour as you will see in my more developed samples below.

Once I got the hang of creating colourful alien-like forms. I tried envisioning pieces on the body. I took inspiration from the designers Lucy Mcrae & Bart Hess and Mi-Mi Moscow. They are both collaborative designers who make creative pieces adorned uniquely on the human form. I like adorning the body in unusual ways because I like morphication and changing the normal shape of the body. Almost like transforming people into underwater creatures themselves. This was my idea.

I wanted to emphasise growth and re-creating the human form. My final outcomes are a mix between final photographs and pieces, aimed to capture unfamiliar shapes and strange alterations to the body.

For my first solution I attached anemone tentacles to the ends of fingers – changing the length and proportion of the fingers to the rest of the body.

Next I created a simple ring with which protrude rather suggestive tentacles. I liked the contrast of the smooth reflective metal to the rubbery matt texture of the latex. The benefits of this ring is you can put on your jacket without worrying about the tentacles breaking off as they are extremely flexible.

Finally I transformed the shape of the back into a kind of extending dorsal fin. Little anemone branches sprout from the surface down the spine as if they were spreading. Long roots stretch across the back to stress this idea of hosting and the ‘taking-over’ of the body.

Next I’ll be looking at making luminescent creatures and incorporating bits of wire to make them look more intricate and delicate. Thanks for checking out some of my work!

http://www.BodyMod.org/flash/mymods.swf

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Creative Paper: Li-Chu Wu

Li-Chu Wu was born in Taipei, Taiwan. She trained in Jewellery Design at Fu Jen Catholic University and graduated in 2006, followed by completing an MA in Jewellery, Silversmithing and Related Products at Birmingham City University in 2009.

Her sculptural jewellery looks nature inspired portrayed by their bulbous organic shapes. I enjoy looking at the lines made by the multiple layers of coloured paper. Wu’s method of placing bold vibrant colours next to one another is effective in making the pieces striking and particularly attractive in appearance. Their value increases when combining the paper with precious materials such as silver, emphasising that these pieces are truly special.

Wu’s intention is to  convey the values of the materials itself. Some of these pieces are small enough to wear and others possibly intended to be displayed as a unique sculpture because I personally could take time observing these pieces individually. The amount of effort put into making each piece in unmeasurable, Wu must take pleasure in “the making” part of design (the repetitive cutting, placing and gluing) because why else would she use these exact processes in every work. I aspire to this and feel similar in when creating my works, the whole repetitive processes such as weaving, beading, soldering I find is very therapeutic and take great enjoyment in doing it.

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Mary Donald: Latex and Plastics

Mary Donald studied at San Diego State University, where she focussed on Metalsmithing & Jewellery Design. She uses various materials such as wood, rubber, plastics, latex, fibre, metal and unusual found objects to make her unconventional jewellery pieces.

Rubber & Mixed Plastics:

Donald skillfully uses latex and monofilament to create these unique organic pieces.

I love the translucent fleshy colours of these pieces and the alien-like forms – they remind me a little of calamari or embryos. The contrast between the dark singed edges and the pale latex is effective because it makes the pieces stand out more on the wearer.

The piece above is made of mixed plastics, oxidised silver and brass. I particularly like the way Donald has spaced out the shapes to give sense of serenity. A variation of techniques have been used to join the translucent shapes together including drilling, riveting etc.

These two pieces are beautiful and elegant.

Donald has created this piece using orange peel and thread. What makes this piece interesting for me is both the texture and the variation of fold made by the shrivelling peel. The dotty white surface contrasting with the smoother outer orange surface are appealing in creating a highly distinctive and interesting piece.

I am really inspired by Donald’s jewellery because she can somehow unite unusual objects together and make it ‘work’. Her method in disguising the materials and making them look unique and ‘of value’ is what I find truly impressive.

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Wearable Food: Reality and Non-Reality

Sung Yeon Ju was  born in Seoul, Korea 1986 and graduated from Hong IK University in 2010. She has created a beautiful series called ‘Wearable Food’ in which she has produced numerous garments made from food then photographing them.

Starting from top left and along the dress are made of: chives; Lotus root; shrimp; aubergine; red cabbage; leeks; BUBBLEGUM; banana; tomatoes. AMAZING!!!!

In her statement she claims that “Photography has a power to make us believe”, suggesting that a picture, no matter how manipulated it is, we will still think it is real. For example, air-brushed photographs of celebrities make us believe they have no cellulite or wrinkles, however this is never the case. So Yeon Ju’s assertion here is that as time passes – food rots and changes colour and shrivels. But through taking a photograph at the particular moment when the food is fresh, it makes us accept that the dress is unchangeable. But in reality, what really happens? The food on the dress decays therefore does not retain their photographed state – it is not real that food stays fresh forever like in the photo. However, looking at the photograph we feel happiness that this short-lived circumstance could remain.

I love this idea of reality vs non-reality as it makes me think differently of perfect photographs of famous celebs. It cannot be real that you always look perfect. These designs also remind me of Lady Gaga’s meat dress she wore which made you GAG more than craving.

Another artist I would suggest to look at is a guy called Ted Sebarese, he has amazing photography, design and sculpture.

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Rebecca Barton and Kate MccGwire

Rebecca Barton is a jeweller born in Alton, Illinois in 1985. She focusses mainly on plants in her work to symbolically illustrate a state of being. I love looking at her jewellery. Barton really emphasises the true beauty and vulnerability of nature through intricate details and detailed portrayals.  I like her use of colour as it creates visual interest and stands out on the wearer.

“deals with a plant that has been uprooted and is therefore vulnerable,” she says. “However, the emotion of the flytrap is one of seduction in order to attract and allure prey; prey that it will use for nourishment and strength.”

(Trapped Neckpiece)

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Kate MccGwire is a little different to Barton. MccGwire was born in Norwich, 1964, the majority of her work is sculpture. She gathers materials from various sources over a period of months, even years. I look in awe at her pieces. She works great with feathers and layer them till they produce lovely flowing, sensuous forms. The viewers’ eye is drawn into the work through the use of continuous rhythmic shapes and the use of unusual material which some observers may find a little disturbing.

as  illustr

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First Year Jewellery Block

We were allowed to choose 2 two week blocks at the end of First Year. I chose Jewellery as my first block.

We were told to go out and look at form, line etc, working in our sketchbooks. Initially I drew architecture and statues but didn’t find inspiration. So I looked outside windows and saw ivy growing on walls. Thus took nature as my inspiration. I created little 3D paper models and stuck them in my sketchbook.

(small dried flowers)


(under part of pine cone)


(Small paper models inspired from drawings)

My drawings of the pine cone reminded me of bird beaks, thus made me immediately think of making a bird nest. I used ivy (as I’d been drawing it previously) and began wrapping it into a bowl/nest shape. I wanted to incorperate a contrast of materials as it creates visual interest. Using wire, I wrapped it round parts of the vines of the nest, it was a nice contrast of textural wood against a shiny surface which captures your eye. The paper beak models were then placed into the centre of the nest as if they were little chicks tweeting for food.

 

 

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Paper, Tone and Scissors

For this Paper project the brief was to create a piece made from only paper. You could use scissors and glue etc. To find inspiration a few friends and I drove to the Dundee Botanic Gardens and took sketchbooks and cameras. I was interested in the drooping forms, tangled vines and dangling tree branches. When we got back to college I immediately started sketching ideas and developing them. We didn’t have a lot of time so I went straight to finalising and making my piece. I got hold of a shredder and shredded bag fulls of the paper. I bundled lots of strips together and tied them with invisible thread and hung each bundle from a wire frame attached high to the ceiling to create the drooping and dangling relating from my sketches. I repeated this process until I had established a mass of  paper. This is how it would capture the viewers attention – through quantity. Whilst I was at the botanic gardens there was a slight breeze, the rustling of the leaves from the trees. To achieve this atmosphere I placed a fan adjacent to my piece, thus, creating a light breeze which stirred the paper achieving the noise from rustling trees.

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