Tag Archives: interior

Luminous Jellyfish

Another very experimental project, following from my Anemone Project, working with fluorescent pigments and ultra-violet light.

Again, my inspiration came from my diving background. In particular, remembering hopping off the boat to go snorkeling and as soon as I got comfortable in the water I saw, what looked like, 8 or so blueish parallel sticks standing vertically underwater. Was very odd. However, as I tried to figure out why they were standing so vertical I noticed there was some kind of clear plastic thing floating above it. I instantly realised that, from the plastic bags’ square shape, it was a Box Jellyfish. Only one of the most poisonous and deadly creatures in the world! As I hurriedly finned to the boat, I shouted “There’s a bloomin’ great big Box Jellyfish in here don’t get in!”

And knowing my dad, he thought it would be good to catch it in our cool box and bring it back to our local Yacht Club to show the kids why stinger/wet suits were so important. My dad actually got stung by one of these bad boys around the ankle.

Anyway, I love seeing how jellyfish move in the water and the different colours they come in. They tend to have luminous tendrils and things that can actually blink to both ward of predators and attract prey. I wanted to investigate ways in which to make colour glow so invested in a UV light bulb which worked wonders! By the way, if you are looking for a UV bulb do NOT get a UV Saving Lamp 75W ES that looks like this:

They might be cheap but they definitely don’t give off UV light just purple light. Just a rip off.

Get one of these Blacklight, ultra violet lamp, low energy BC/B22 Bayonet Fitting High UV light intensity 20W:

These are more expensive, at £9.50 a pop, but are worth the money.

Here are my final pieces. I want to develop this project and make hovering jewellery pieces that look like they are floating with the tide around the body. However, I was really tight with time so made them interior hanging objects.

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Stylish Eco-Designers: Campana, Yoshioka, Liddle and Miller

Throughout my summer holidays I have been pondering about what I could focus my jewellery upon for my 3rd year of Jewellery. Who do I want to be? How can I create an identity for myself?

I have been looking at some local designers from Orkney (Sheila Fleet, Ortak, etc) to get a better understanding of who their identities are. I can particularly remember talking to Sheila Fleet and her mentioning to look at local materials and which one’s prices are falling. This subject of price remained with me. I want my jewellery to be affordable and as eco-friendly as possible. So to spark my imagination I looked up some Eco-designs just to see how far you really can go with being green.

Fernando and Humberto Campana are brilliant Eco-Designers who love making use of off-cuts like carpet, plastic and rubber which would normally go into landfill. Look how they transform rubbish into crazy new art!

It’s like a celebration of normal everyday materials which would never be appreciated otherwise! Abandoned scraps are re-born. In addition, there would be little energy put into making these chairs which supports the idea of eco-friendliness.

Tokujin Yoshioka, from Japan, is another designer who creates chairs entirely out of paper. Amazing! The structural strength derives purely from the cortena folds of the paper itself.

These chairs can even be flat-packed as they open up just like traditional Chinese lanterns. Yoshioka has created the seat by simply sitting on the cortena-folded paper and sculpting the form around him – the paper gets squashed and crumples until it settles into a quite strong seat for the sitter. The materials are very lightweight making it easier for the movement of furniture and is completely recyclable.

Richard Liddle transforms your everyday high-density polyethylene (HDPE) milk bottle into an RD4S chair. A chair with an expression of new born waste. Liddle makes these chairs by melting and extruding the flake form recyclate (milk bottles) and wraps the ribbons of plastic around moulds of chairs. The outcome is a lightweight and strong chair that is unique and is a fraction of the energy that would be used in everyday chairs.

Corrugated cardboard is the recyclable material which Giles Miller is famous for using. He cuts strips of cardboard using a CNC machine (a computer numerical control machine) and the beautiful floral shapes are made by using a fret saw (used by Jewellers to achieve tight curves etc). He creates two shades and inserts them into one another’s gaps with the corrugations aligned in opposite directions to achieve contrasting textures. Through Miller’s use of cheap and ordinary materials he has excelled and given cardboard new life!

Who knew how much creativity can spark from boring in-expensive materials. They have been given new life and have been saved from being tipped into landfill. I hope to bring this idea of recycling into some of my work. Perhaps asking Tescos what their biggest waste product is and then using it to my advantage.

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