Category Archives: Eco

Wire Weaving

I have been having a good go at weaving wire this summer and have even ordered a wee batch of coloured wire for myself! Brilliant start.

What I have just finished is a purple necklace which I had weaved round and round a paint brush. Yes you can weave around anything these days.

The close-up detailing of the loops I think are pretty fancy. The necklace consists of a continuous looping technique which can be worked without needles. I have added small red bead embellishments to create more visual interest and intricacy.

Here’s another sample I have worked on which I am hoping to turn into some earrings.

Wire can be worked in so many different ways as I have discovered from looking at so many different designers. For instance Teri Howes uses a very similar technique to what I have just used. Processes Howes use include wire crochet, wire knitting with two needles, and wire knitting on a spool.

Howes’s inspiration comes from textiles, pattern, geometry, architectural and sculptural forms. Her designs are so intricate and delicate in appearance which I particularly like. Very feminine.

The jewellery looks reminiscent to that of the Victorian period: full of lace-like pattern. It is as if Howes draws with the wire.

I like the way in which Howes does not use machine when creating these delicate pieces. A quiet rebellion against the mass-produced products we buy these days.

Judith Brown is quite similar to Teri Howes in the way in which she also weaves and hand stitches in wire. She is a British Designer Maker and her jewellery possesses a delicate feminine note. Brown learnt how to sew and knit from an early age with her mum and thus, textiles has played a big part in her work.

This piece comes from Brown’s Vintage Lace Collection.

This dramatic bracelet is a combination of knitting and twisting techniques and is made of fine copper wire embellished with tiny glass beads.

Another designer who excells in using wire is Welsh wire sculptor John Bivel-Fauvel.

Large Jellyfish

Bivet-Fauvel is inspired by cultures from history (old and new) and nature, both from land and sea. Instead of just copying , he attempts to capture the quality and essence of nature. All his works are made from found and inessential materials: “the wire I use comes from inside slot machines, electric motors, transformers and any other sources I can find”, thus, all his pieces consist of recycled materials which I really like.

Octopus

His technique is knitting, initially using a knitting machine. However, for more difficult forms he rapidly began to construct his own frames, made all from reclaimed materials of course, to create his sea creatures. The range of work by Binet-Fauvel can be as small as tiny prawns to the great octopus which possess 1-metre long tenticles.

Small Jellyfish

Bivet-Fauvel uses his knowledge of sea creatures to make woven bags inspired from mussels and clams. In addition he creates headgear, body pieces and creatures.

Mussel Handbag
Spiral Form

Form observing works from other designers, I have understood more about how to create 3D forms, thus, hope to create some more experimental samples. Perhaps begin knitting and crocheting to achieve different patterns and holes in the piece.

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Stylish Eco-Designers: Campana, Yoshioka, Liddle and Miller

Throughout my summer holidays I have been pondering about what I could focus my jewellery upon for my 3rd year of Jewellery. Who do I want to be? How can I create an identity for myself?

I have been looking at some local designers from Orkney (Sheila Fleet, Ortak, etc) to get a better understanding of who their identities are. I can particularly remember talking to Sheila Fleet and her mentioning to look at local materials and which one’s prices are falling. This subject of price remained with me. I want my jewellery to be affordable and as eco-friendly as possible. So to spark my imagination I looked up some Eco-designs just to see how far you really can go with being green.

Fernando and Humberto Campana are brilliant Eco-Designers who love making use of off-cuts like carpet, plastic and rubber which would normally go into landfill. Look how they transform rubbish into crazy new art!

It’s like a celebration of normal everyday materials which would never be appreciated otherwise! Abandoned scraps are re-born. In addition, there would be little energy put into making these chairs which supports the idea of eco-friendliness.

Tokujin Yoshioka, from Japan, is another designer who creates chairs entirely out of paper. Amazing! The structural strength derives purely from the cortena folds of the paper itself.

These chairs can even be flat-packed as they open up just like traditional Chinese lanterns. Yoshioka has created the seat by simply sitting on the cortena-folded paper and sculpting the form around him – the paper gets squashed and crumples until it settles into a quite strong seat for the sitter. The materials are very lightweight making it easier for the movement of furniture and is completely recyclable.

Richard Liddle transforms your everyday high-density polyethylene (HDPE) milk bottle into an RD4S chair. A chair with an expression of new born waste. Liddle makes these chairs by melting and extruding the flake form recyclate (milk bottles) and wraps the ribbons of plastic around moulds of chairs. The outcome is a lightweight and strong chair that is unique and is a fraction of the energy that would be used in everyday chairs.

Corrugated cardboard is the recyclable material which Giles Miller is famous for using. He cuts strips of cardboard using a CNC machine (a computer numerical control machine) and the beautiful floral shapes are made by using a fret saw (used by Jewellers to achieve tight curves etc). He creates two shades and inserts them into one another’s gaps with the corrugations aligned in opposite directions to achieve contrasting textures. Through Miller’s use of cheap and ordinary materials he has excelled and given cardboard new life!

Who knew how much creativity can spark from boring in-expensive materials. They have been given new life and have been saved from being tipped into landfill. I hope to bring this idea of recycling into some of my work. Perhaps asking Tescos what their biggest waste product is and then using it to my advantage.

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