Category Archives: Drawing

Sea Anemone Project

My family are all scuba divers. I love being under the water it’s such a magical place! Feel like a mermaid. It’s brilliant. When I’m under I usually tend to touch things. It’s tempting when there’s colourful little feathery crawlies and wobbly jellies. Once, I got so into it I actually rubbed my face against a sea anemone and it ended up stinging me all over! Ouch. Yes – tip for today: maybe don’t touch things when you haven’t got a clue what it is. Following on from that, I based this project on sea anemones.

They are amazing underwater jellies that possess long wobbly tentacles which wave with the tide. Their colours are vibrant and can usually in groups competing for light just like land plants would do. I really wanted to capture this sense of cluster growth and bright colour, in addition to their strange jelly quality. Here are some of my sketches illustrating their bulbous forms, colour and alien-like features. Be prepared, some of them can be a bit… well, a bit suggestive in shape.

The last picture was my first sample in which I created 3-dimensional crevasses and little hints of colour. I was very pleased with the result as allowed me to think of all kinds of shapes –  the possibilities seemed endless! I even got excited about colour as you will see in my more developed samples below.

Once I got the hang of creating colourful alien-like forms. I tried envisioning pieces on the body. I took inspiration from the designers Lucy Mcrae & Bart Hess and Mi-Mi Moscow. They are both collaborative designers who make creative pieces adorned uniquely on the human form. I like adorning the body in unusual ways because I like morphication and changing the normal shape of the body. Almost like transforming people into underwater creatures themselves. This was my idea.

I wanted to emphasise growth and re-creating the human form. My final outcomes are a mix between final photographs and pieces, aimed to capture unfamiliar shapes and strange alterations to the body.

For my first solution I attached anemone tentacles to the ends of fingers – changing the length and proportion of the fingers to the rest of the body.

Next I created a simple ring with which protrude rather suggestive tentacles. I liked the contrast of the smooth reflective metal to the rubbery matt texture of the latex. The benefits of this ring is you can put on your jacket without worrying about the tentacles breaking off as they are extremely flexible.

Finally I transformed the shape of the back into a kind of extending dorsal fin. Little anemone branches sprout from the surface down the spine as if they were spreading. Long roots stretch across the back to stress this idea of hosting and the ‘taking-over’ of the body.

Next I’ll be looking at making luminescent creatures and incorporating bits of wire to make them look more intricate and delicate. Thanks for checking out some of my work!

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Critical Making: The Body & Technology Team Project – Week 2


In week 2, we narrowed down our ideas and discussed which one was the strongest. We developed our strongest idea, trying to create it for a purpose as originally it seemed to not fill a gap in the market. Thus, we thought of ideas that would be made for a purpose. POD-ED: a place where you can take your child for a worry-free health check up, whilst letting them have a little fun and education. After coming up with this fab idea we worked on different aspects of the design – the interior, exterior etc. This is where all of our different disciplines came into play. Good times.

From left to right: Cara, Judy and Rosalind.

We met up in the Duncan of Jordanstone Library and had a good chat about what could be included and how they contributed to the design as a whole. We had A LOT of fun with this. Designs were drawn and ideas were noted, this is how we seemed to work best. Are possible ways of monitoring different aspects of health without it being obvious? Such as dexterity? Heart-Rate? Weight? Well this is what we investigated. The room would be filled with discrete monitoring devices which will be explained further in the next post.

Pea-pod designs links to Pod name and encourages children to eat vegetables.
Sketch of interior

I made some resin samples during the first week to show the group what nice colours you can get with them – almost gem-like.

On the same day, whilst us textile and jewellery people were busy idea hunting, the IED girls (Shona and Cara) went ahead and made a down-scaled model of the Pod in cardboard. Got to say it was really surprising how great it came out in the small amount of time they had!

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Critical Making: The Body & Technology Team Project – Week 1


Yes well, this is me finally posting something after many weeks of working on projects. Every Wednesday morning and Thursday we worked on a project called The Body & Technology Project. The project started with a fascinating slide show introduction presented by, the funny, Jason Nelson. The aims of this course is to:

  • help us to develop a cleared understanding of critical thinking and making.
  • develop understanding of materials, fabrication and construction
  • explore historical and contemporary concepts in making.


After our introduction we were put into our allocated groups to get to know one another, they were: Rosalind Crawford from Textiles (who I knew from 1st year – she’s brilliant!), Judy Scott from Textiles (lovely lady with a talent for fabrics), Cara from Interior & Environmental Design (or IED), Shona Cairns from IED and, of course, myself from Jewellery & Metal Work.

Each team were given a subject to base their designs on – our subject was HEALTH. Immediately, my team got excited about the project – even when walking from the lecture theatre to our studios we discussed what we could do and make! It became clear that we were a focussed and hard-working group just from judging from that walk.

We visited each of our studios to give one another an idea of what facilities and spaces were on offer, as well as explaining our strengths which could possibly make our group excel more than others.


After the tours we sat down and began kicking off the project with some brainstorming. This lasted for the whole day! Working together, I felt, was an excellent way to build confidence in your own ideas and to create stronger ideas as others contribute to them. It blended thoughts from different mind-sets (textiles, jewellery and IED) establishing a fantastic method of realising how broad your own discipline can become! Ideas we brainstormed were having the body in balance – to feel relaxed and mentally at ease. This is what we thought could benefit health and THIS is where our team name came about. Balance relates to the astrological sign LIBRA (balancing scales). However we thought if we translated the word into a different language it would sound memorable and more professional, thus, came up with the Swedish term ‘Vågen‘, meaning scales, however our spelling was VOGEN.

We had a really productive day brainstorming and turning up different solutions to answer our brief – HEALTH. We incorporated smart materials, wearable computers, radio frequencies an 3D printing into some of our ideas. Through this method of group brainstorming it allowed our team VOGEN to really grow, bounce ideas off one another, become motivated and enthusiastic about the project.

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Line in Wire

Our second project is to design and make a jewellery body piece using wire. The natural feature of wire is the LINE. To get inspiration I went out and drew silhouettes – scaffolding on buildings, telephone posts and cables etc. I then walked past a playground and immediately got drawn to the monkey bars and climbing frames: full of LINE. I sat and drew looking at the shapes and patterns the lines created.









I then developed my sketches by stretching, fattening, bending, repeating and sharpening the shapes and so on. I also placed my design ideas onto drawings of figures to find out the scale.










We then spent a week to create designs on the computer programs Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator. I had never used Illustrator before so it was very exciting! There is so many different tools compared to the familiar program Photoshop. You can copy and rotate objects to create wheels and alter lines in your design so easily which would take so much longer by hand. Definitely going to use this program in future designs.




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Leonardo Da Vinci: The Perfect Human Body

After watching a short documentary called ‘The Beauty of Diagrams: Vitruvian Man’ presented by Professor Marcus du Sautoy, I have discovered that the aim of the Vitruvian Man diagram by Leonardo Da Vinci was not just a beautiful drawing but it was to show through science and art the perfection of the human body.

Da Vinci came from a small Tuscan village who constantly travelled like most artists. He worked in many places such as Florence, Mulan and Venice. It is hard to define what he was exactly. Was he an artist? Musician? Botanist? Anatomist? Engineer? Architect? Turns out he was all of these things. He painted the iconic Mona Lisa, designed military hardware and was the first artist to cut open a human body, dissect and draw human organs and bones. He possessed a strong thirst for knowledge: feet, skulls, and hands, hearts, and lungs, muscles, and sinews, buildings, bridges, and machines. He obsessively dissected, drew and examined like no other artist had done before. For him science and art were one. His aim for dissecting and drawing the body obsessively was to find the perfect geometric proportions that ruled the natural world – and God’s greatest creations was man himself.

Da Vinci: ‘Man is the model of the world’


There are so many meanings to the Vitruvian Man diagram. Yes it is about the body and human anatomy but as you look in depth you can see mathematics and geometry. It is in fact a solution to an early arch itectural problem. The problem, about buildings and mans’ proportions. Other artists in the past tried but failed. Da Vinci’s diagram is one which conveys that man is the ideal geometric model for architecture.

Da Vinci’s inspirations came from the classical works on architecture by the Roman writer Vitruvius. Vitruvius said ‘For any building to be beautiful it must have perfect symmetry and proportions like those found in nature’, thus, resulted in Da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man.

The task laid down by Vitruvius was to position a man on his back with arms stretched out and have his fingers and toes touch the circle’s circumference pinpointed on the mans naval and also to plac e the same man inside a square. When observing the Vitruvian Man you can see lines situated on certain places the body. These lines represent the different proportions that the body possess. For example: four fingers make up a palm, six palms make up the distance from the top of the finger to the elbow, then four times the distance from finger to elbow makes up the height of the man. The diagram indicates the proportions of the human body and its link to architecture.

But what does the circle and square mean? They were seen as perfect shapes in nature in the Renaissance. They were also important to Vitruvius. He thought temples were the perfect buildings as they were a close link to God. A square formed the floor and the circle – the dome.

At last, the final layer – movement – captured in Da Vinci’s diagram by the man’s unique double pose. Martin Kemp and graphic designer Steve Maher collaborated and took the task in exploring movement to create an animation. The idea was based upon Da Vinci’s drawings as he sketches sequences poses and a single drawing captures the feeling of movement. He analysed movement like animators would do to understand how beings move. However, Da Vinci did not have the tools to create movement out of his drawings, thus created series of them.

There is a sculpture of the Vitruvian Man in London’s Belgrave Square which captures the diagrams 3D potential. This proves how iconic Da Vinci’s drawing has become. For me, it is not as effective as Da Vinci’s diagram – it looks like there are two men merged together rather than the one man in motion. However it is striking to the eye through its large scale.

I personally can’t think of any other diagram which has had so much publicity and success. The Vitruvian Man has been given a lot of iconic treatment. His drawings are very popular with today’s artists, thus, I think will truly remain an iconic and remembered piece of art for many years to come.

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Vessel Project

Yay! Just been spending four weeks on my vessel project. The brief was to create a vessel out of metal using at least one texture. We had to make at least 10 metal samples by the end of the first week.  My vessel relates to the vessels inside your body. Blood vessels. I actually bought a heart from the butcher to dissect, photograph and sketch from. Very interesting… I’m terribly squeemish as well! I focussed on the textures and shapes. There is a type of vessel in the heart called the mitral valve, it is a dual-flap which controls the flow of blood in and out of the heart. There are tiny branch-like tendons attached to the flap. I took sketches of this valve and developed them as I liked the delicate and intricate lines the tendons possessed.




I then thought of how the heart is surrounded and protected by a rib cage and lungs. The lungs have intricate tree-like bronchioles that look delicate and fragile. I wanted to convey this idea of ‘protection’ and ‘fragility’ in my piece.



So for my final piece I wanted to enclose the heart in some kind of cage. A lung cage. I saw pierced four flaps of copper – took ages! Oxidised the flaps and sprayed clear laquer. For the heart pendant I fly pressed a small heart, hammered it to create more texture, oxidised it, rubbed red acrylic paint into it and sprayed clear laquer to make it all shiny.

There is one hinged flap which makes it easier to take out the pendant inside. The cords are red and blue for a reason – because in biology books and pictures for organs etc they colour code  the vein and artery so you don’t get confused. The veins are coded blue and the arteries – red.

(Above picture: with the flap hinged close – protected)

I also like the shadows the cage produce, creating more visual impact.

I really enjoyed this project, it let us experiment on different materials and techniques. We learnt how to hinge, score, oxidise and much more through a series of work shop tutorials. I am pleased with my final piece as it makes viewers aware that our hearts are important to us. We need to keep it healthy and ‘protect’ it from bad foods and substances. If we didn’t no blood would be pumped throughout our body’s thus the cells would get no oxygen and we’d die.





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Christmas Portrait 2009

During the Christmas holidays our project was to create a self portrait. It could be a sculpture/ installation/ painting – the medium was our choice. In my portrait I wanted to convey my background and the way I have pieced my life together. This is why I have chosen to paint on an actual puzzle. By ‘piecing my life together’ I mean my change from being in a low horrible place in my life and into the light. Coming from a place a hated to a place I am happy in, thus, finding my feet. Looking forward to the future and getting back to normal.Even the choice in puzzle reflects my background – diving. I started diving at the age of four under my dad’s arm and continue to this day.

The cut-out at the bottom of the painting is inspired by my past, where I used to live, in Brunei.


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Source Drawing & Development

Sitting down and drawing still life’s and objects and developing one of them into 3 small final pieces. I must add

that I’m not actually a scary  blood thirsty person! The forks just reminded me of daggers and an aggressive nature that explains the final pieces…

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Sightedness and Drawing

I’ve never done figure drawing so his was all new to me! However, I think we all know it’s an amazing way to put expression into your work. I experimented with line, colour, tone and different mediums. Hope you like them 🙂

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