Category Archives: Craft

Lorenzo Nanni: Prosthetic Jewellery

Lorenzo Nanni studied textiles at Duperré Art School in Paris. He is influenced by organic and living organisms, pulsating slightly eerie matter re-born and replicated in embroideries and silk. Nanni uses these materials in a very unusual way; using embroideries to imitate the texture of blood and producing fake skin out of silk. Reproducing the essence and beauty of nature is his goal.



His prosthetic pieces come encased in a glass dome so they can also be exhibited as an elaborate sculpture as well as worn to the human body. The pieces may take many forms, mostly all coming from natural resources, using animal life and vegetation, body tissue, veins and arteries, to produce stunning yet at times dark and cheerless pieces.




I really like Nanni’s works because they are unique and creative. His use of embroideries and silk are particularly imaginative; establishing interesting textures. I enjoy the contrast of beautiful versus sinister themes, you feel a sense of uneasiness which lures the viewer in and makes the pieces memorable. I am not sure if I would want to wear these pieces out, however, as an elaborate sculpture in the room would be ideal.

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Wire Weaving

I have been having a good go at weaving wire this summer and have even ordered a wee batch of coloured wire for myself! Brilliant start.

What I have just finished is a purple necklace which I had weaved round and round a paint brush. Yes you can weave around anything these days.

The close-up detailing of the loops I think are pretty fancy. The necklace consists of a continuous looping technique which can be worked without needles. I have added small red bead embellishments to create more visual interest and intricacy.

Here’s another sample I have worked on which I am hoping to turn into some earrings.

Wire can be worked in so many different ways as I have discovered from looking at so many different designers. For instance Teri Howes uses a very similar technique to what I have just used. Processes Howes use include wire crochet, wire knitting with two needles, and wire knitting on a spool.

Howes’s inspiration comes from textiles, pattern, geometry, architectural and sculptural forms. Her designs are so intricate and delicate in appearance which I particularly like. Very feminine.

The jewellery looks reminiscent to that of the Victorian period: full of lace-like pattern. It is as if Howes draws with the wire.

I like the way in which Howes does not use machine when creating these delicate pieces. A quiet rebellion against the mass-produced products we buy these days.

Judith Brown is quite similar to Teri Howes in the way in which she also weaves and hand stitches in wire. She is a British Designer Maker and her jewellery possesses a delicate feminine note. Brown learnt how to sew and knit from an early age with her mum and thus, textiles has played a big part in her work.

This piece comes from Brown’s Vintage Lace Collection.

This dramatic bracelet is a combination of knitting and twisting techniques and is made of fine copper wire embellished with tiny glass beads.

Another designer who excells in using wire is Welsh wire sculptor John Bivel-Fauvel.

Large Jellyfish

Bivet-Fauvel is inspired by cultures from history (old and new) and nature, both from land and sea. Instead of just copying , he attempts to capture the quality and essence of nature. All his works are made from found and inessential materials: “the wire I use comes from inside slot machines, electric motors, transformers and any other sources I can find”, thus, all his pieces consist of recycled materials which I really like.


His technique is knitting, initially using a knitting machine. However, for more difficult forms he rapidly began to construct his own frames, made all from reclaimed materials of course, to create his sea creatures. The range of work by Binet-Fauvel can be as small as tiny prawns to the great octopus which possess 1-metre long tenticles.

Small Jellyfish

Bivet-Fauvel uses his knowledge of sea creatures to make woven bags inspired from mussels and clams. In addition he creates headgear, body pieces and creatures.

Mussel Handbag
Spiral Form

Form observing works from other designers, I have understood more about how to create 3D forms, thus, hope to create some more experimental samples. Perhaps begin knitting and crocheting to achieve different patterns and holes in the piece.

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Stylish Eco-Designers: Campana, Yoshioka, Liddle and Miller

Throughout my summer holidays I have been pondering about what I could focus my jewellery upon for my 3rd year of Jewellery. Who do I want to be? How can I create an identity for myself?

I have been looking at some local designers from Orkney (Sheila Fleet, Ortak, etc) to get a better understanding of who their identities are. I can particularly remember talking to Sheila Fleet and her mentioning to look at local materials and which one’s prices are falling. This subject of price remained with me. I want my jewellery to be affordable and as eco-friendly as possible. So to spark my imagination I looked up some Eco-designs just to see how far you really can go with being green.

Fernando and Humberto Campana are brilliant Eco-Designers who love making use of off-cuts like carpet, plastic and rubber which would normally go into landfill. Look how they transform rubbish into crazy new art!

It’s like a celebration of normal everyday materials which would never be appreciated otherwise! Abandoned scraps are re-born. In addition, there would be little energy put into making these chairs which supports the idea of eco-friendliness.

Tokujin Yoshioka, from Japan, is another designer who creates chairs entirely out of paper. Amazing! The structural strength derives purely from the cortena folds of the paper itself.

These chairs can even be flat-packed as they open up just like traditional Chinese lanterns. Yoshioka has created the seat by simply sitting on the cortena-folded paper and sculpting the form around him – the paper gets squashed and crumples until it settles into a quite strong seat for the sitter. The materials are very lightweight making it easier for the movement of furniture and is completely recyclable.

Richard Liddle transforms your everyday high-density polyethylene (HDPE) milk bottle into an RD4S chair. A chair with an expression of new born waste. Liddle makes these chairs by melting and extruding the flake form recyclate (milk bottles) and wraps the ribbons of plastic around moulds of chairs. The outcome is a lightweight and strong chair that is unique and is a fraction of the energy that would be used in everyday chairs.

Corrugated cardboard is the recyclable material which Giles Miller is famous for using. He cuts strips of cardboard using a CNC machine (a computer numerical control machine) and the beautiful floral shapes are made by using a fret saw (used by Jewellers to achieve tight curves etc). He creates two shades and inserts them into one another’s gaps with the corrugations aligned in opposite directions to achieve contrasting textures. Through Miller’s use of cheap and ordinary materials he has excelled and given cardboard new life!

Who knew how much creativity can spark from boring in-expensive materials. They have been given new life and have been saved from being tipped into landfill. I hope to bring this idea of recycling into some of my work. Perhaps asking Tescos what their biggest waste product is and then using it to my advantage.

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Tie a Knot in Your Friendship

The other day, bored, I stumbled across a website about friendship bracelets. Inspired, I began investigating patterns of all sorts. Such an array! The craft began in Central America  and then became popular in the US during the 1970s. These bracelets consist of a lot of weaving and knotting which is a form of macramé. In keeping with tradition, the person who has been given the bracelet must wear it until the warps fray and drop naturally to praise the effort and love for the friend who made it, thus the bracelet is a symbol of friendship.

Bracelets I’ve made!

I’m hoping to integrate this type of knotting and weaving into some of my work as you can use such beautiful colours and pattern. I could maybe use recycled materials such as plastic bags, cut-up t-shirts, increase the scale etc. Just some suggestions.

Oh and if you are wanting to learn some basic knotting here is something to get you on your way 🙂

All friendship bracelets are made using two basic knots: forward knots and backward knots:

Forward Knot

1. Strands side by side.

2. Pass the left strand over the right to create a 4 shape with the threads like below.

3. Then take the left strand under the right and pull upwards to the left to tighten the loop. Do this same process one time more to finish your forward knot.

Backward Knot

1. Strands side by side.

2. Take the right strand over the left strand just as below.

3. Then take the right strand under the left and pull upwards to the right to tighten the loop. Again every knot consists of two of these loops to prevent the bracelet from curling. THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT!

Bracelet Patterns:


This simple bracelet should start you off nicely.

You need 4 different coloured threads (1.5m/60 inches long) to create this chevron pattern.

I have used: Sap Green (S1 and S8), Cyan (C2 and C7), Olive Green (O3 and O6), and Jungle Green (J4 and J5).

1a. (Row 1)

Forward Knots

Fold the 1.5m/60 inch long threads in half and tie a knot. Pass a safety pin through the loop or any other device that will keep the end secure whilst you work. Separate the threads into order, mirroring the colours on each side like above.


Begin at the left-hand side and forward knot thread S1 around C2 like above.


Forward knot thread S1 around O3 like above. Pull tight so the knot sits against the first knot. [REMEMBER EVERY KNOT CONSISTS OF TWO LOOPS!]


Forward knot S1 around J4 and tighten. Well done your half way finishing this row! You will see that S1 has moved to the middle:


Now move to the right-hand side and make a backward knot with S8 around C7 like above.


Backward knot S8 around O6 like above.


Backward knot S8 around J5 and tighten against the others to form the second half of the row. After tightening it should look something like this:


Finally to finish the row make a backward knot with S8 around S1.

2a. (Row 2)

Backward Knots

Start the second row at the left-hand side, making forward knots with C2 around O3, C2 around J4, and finally C2 around S8. Make sure you pull each knot tight up against the first row.


Shift to the right-hand side and begin backward knotting C7 around O6, C7 around J5, and finally C7 around S1. Tightening each knot up against the first row.


Make a backward knot with C7 around C2 as below and pull tight. Well done you have now finished your second row!

Adjust the knots to create even V-shapes in your bracelet , so it looks something like below.

Follow this exact same principles to complete your bracelet. Starting on the left-hand side thread into the middle, then move to the right-hand thread into the middle again and knot in centre. When finishing each row you should have each side mirroring colours.

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Catwalk Project

This project was pretty challenging. We were asked to design an extravagant and unusual piece of catwalk jewellery. The inspiration for the piece, being a particular culture or a specific period in history. We were advised to make use of scale, colour and form.

In the end, after spending a lot time researching different cultures and designers, Sarawak became my theme. Sarawak is a Malaysian region in north-west Borneo, and means a great deal to me because when I was young, my family took me trekking around there and we even lived with the tribe for a couple of weeks. What an experience. I focussed mainly on colours they use, symbols and tradition.

I experimented with weaving, which is a huge tradition in Sarawak, the woven art possess symbols and designs which represent certain animals like deer, birds, frogs, etc. These symbols are meant to protect the village by warding off bad spirits. You can see some etched tribal designs on the circular pendant hanging from my piece. In addition, I practiced weaving in wire and yarn and ended up weaving 2 long tubes of black wire which took me AGES. I could have machine knitted the wire but my intention was to keep up the tradition of Sarawak and keep weaving by hand. There are two colours running consistently through my piece (black and red), this is because red and black are used frequently in Sarawak art and textiles: red representing sacrifice, courage and determination; black symbolises rich natural resources and wealth of Sarawak such as timber and petroleum. The black weaved tubes are attached to both ears creating a feeling of awkwardness and weight. The reason behind this is in Sarawak, they consider lengthened ears beautiful thus wanted my piece to be more of an experience rather than aesthetic. To express the true pain of beauty and tradition in Sarawak. I have had people ask me “would this be kind of sore to wear?”, well yes of course, but this is nothing compared to some of the weights Sarawak women have to dangle from their ears. They can be up to 100 grams in weight each!

(Development: weaved coloured sires, weaved yarns, beadwork samples)

(Development: piece was going to be attached the hair to focus on awkwardness but issue with it staying on, thus replaced weight on ears)

Near the end of the project, we were taught how to use the photography studio. Man was confusing at first! Really enjoyed it though.

I really enjoyed this project as it allowed me to experiment with unfamiliar materials and different techniques (weaving, photography, etc). However, it still seems unfinished to me so will work on it during the easter break. I strongly believe jewellery should not only be aesthetically beautiful, but tell a story, have a deeper meaning. How, in some countries, beauty must be accompanied with pain.

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Are You What You Wear/Buy/Sit/ On/Sleep In/Talk To?

For this assignment we were asked to team up with a student from a different discipline who we did not know well and swap photos and contact details with one another. We were NOT allowed to discuss the photos with them. We then had to analyse them asking questions to ourselves like ‘What do they like? What are their favourite colours? Who are their influences? etc’. For my partner, I received three photos of her bedroom.

Analysis and Deduction

From looking at her pictures, I can say that perhaps she likes animal print (blanket), knitting and craft (needles on her desk and probably craft box beneath them), fashion (posters of fashion above her desk), handbags (hanging on the back of door), clothes, and tattoos (Ed Hardy book on top of her stack of books on her desk). This suggests she likes patterns, enjoys making things herself especially using fabric (and also supported by the fact she does textiles), likes to keep up with the latest trends and fashion (especially supported by the Gucci hand bags), and takes an interest in tattoo designs. There is a Cream book on her desk which probably implies she likes the band? There is an abundance of pink and black in her room, possibly colours she likes?

Her influences could be from her friends as there is a picture of her and her friend, both looking alike. They look like they take pride in their appearance and takes care of themselves. She perhaps is significantly influenced by ‘what’s hot now’ (magazines, tv, fashion) due to the amount of fashion pictures above her desk. My partner looks like an extrovert, supported by the crown symbols on her duvet which emphasises the idea that she likes feeling like a princess? Thinks highly of herself? There is alcohol next to her window suggesting she likes going out, socialising and having fun and, in addition, there is fruit suggesting she likes to keep healthy and look after herself.

She possesses a laptop, a variety of creams, hair products, alcohol, shoes, hand bags, clock, Ed Hardy book and a paisley print scarf, thus, looks like she is middle class. Everything looks new, well looked after, organised and tidy, backed up by the boxes and containers to keep everything sorted and neat and the calendar. Everything looks like a similar style but bought from different shops.

My partner has customised her space by placing nic-nacs and objects in containers: organisation and tidiness is obviously crucial to her, the space is uncluttered possibly suggesting she feels stressed when surrounded by mess. Her room is well-lit, maybe due to the needle-work and her discipline, her space is also comfortable – a sign of high conscientiousness.


After analysing the photos, we contacted each other and discussed our findings. I was pretty accurate apart from she did not like the colours pink and black and no she did not like the band ‘Cream’ at all. I got everything else right – how she takes pride in her appearance, she likes to look after herself, she loves tattoos, fashion and craft.

Her analysis of me was pretty much spot on! She said I was well-travelled, influenced by my sister and brought back objects from all over the world. She has not revealed anything new about me, I already knew I love colour and pattern and that my home is comfortable.


From this experiment, I learnt that my personality and home ambience can easily be conveyed simply through looking at pictures from my past. On the other hand, looking at my partners life, apart from feeling like an intruder, I felt very different to her. Different in personality, lifestyle and culture because in my room there are objects and trinkets from all over the world and in my partners room there were none. In the end, this saddens me because sometimes I wish I had just grown up in one place so that I would feel properly settled and feel like I properly fitted in. But in a different context, I feel fine that somebody has analysed my pictures because it would maybe give them an altered perception of life or they may just gain something from it. Who knows.


What do they like? Animal print (duvet), hand bags, knitting (craft, needles on her desk), fashion (from the posters above her desk), Ed Hardy tattoo box on desk
Who are their favourite bands or TV Stars? Cream
Favourite authors?
Favourite Colours? Pink, black
There is a picture of her and her friend, they both look like they take pride in their appearance, take care of themselves. Looks like she keeps up with the present trends due to the amount of pictures above her desk and the Gucci hand bags hanging on her door. Looks like an extravert due to the crowns on her duvet maybe thinking she’s a princess? (sorry!) Also the picture on her bedside table she’s with her friend, looks like they’re at a party or club thus likes to socialise and have fun.
What do they own? Laptop, creams, hair products, alcohol, shoes, hand bags, clock, Ed Hardy book, Cream book, paisley print scarf hanging on wall.
Are they middle class? MIDDLE
Is everything new? Looks new, well looked after, organised, tidy.
Is there a mix of styles or does everything look like it was bought at the same time or from the same shop? Everything looks the same but bought from different shops.
How have they customised the space around them? Everything’s in containers, a calendar with a pencil under it, organisation and tidiness is obviously crucial to her, the space is uncluttered, well lit, comfortable and her books are organised a sign of high concientiousness.
How have they made their own? Yes, I think she likes pattern.


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Mosaic Lattice Knitting

Yes I am knitting a wee scarf and it WAS going to be for my mum HOWEVER I have decided to knit her a tea cosy instead so I am just knitting this for myself. I just thought I might show you how I am getting on! I would say it is moderately easy as it can get very confusing especially if you finish a row and forget what row from the instructions it was!


You will obviously need a pair of knitting needles (the size is up to you) I used size 3 1/4mm for the end of the scarf, then 7 1/2mm, then the needles in the photos are 10mm.

Also you will need 2 different coloured yarns, preferably one light and one dark.


  1. Cast on a multiple of eight stitches. Whether you use 8, 16, 72 stitches or more will depend on how wide of a piece you need for your project. Cast on with the lighter yarn and purl the first row.
  2. Use the darker yarn to knit the next row. Knit two, slip stitch one, then knit three, slip stitch one and knit one Repeat the pattern until you reach the end of the row.
  3. Create the next row by using the same yarn to slip all the slip stitches from the previous row and purl the stitches that were knitted in the previous row.
  4. Switch to the lighter yarn and slip one stitch, knit three, slip one and knit three. Repeat until you reach the end of the row. Repeat Step 3 for the next row.
  5. Change to the darker yarn. Begin by knitting one and slip stitching one and repeat to the end of the row. Repeat Step 3 for the next row.
  6. Working with the lighter yarn, knit two, slip stitch one, knit three, slip stitch one and knit one. Repeat from the first slip stitch and work to the end of the row. Repeat Step 3 for the next row.
  7. Start the next row with a slip stitch in the darker color. Continue using that yarn to knit three, slip stitch one and knit three. Repeat Step 3 for the next row in the lighter color. Purl the following row.
  8. Keep alternating the light and dark colors and repeat Steps 4 through 8 until your mosaic lattice swatch is as long as you need it to be. Complete your piece by binding off the final row.

Note: A slip stitch is a stitch that is simply moved from the left-hand needle to the right without knitting or purling it.


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